Stories told around a campfire seem to never be forgotten.

There is a special aura of a campfire setting that causes a person to readily recall a story told to him or her at a campfire. In ancient times before television and electronic gadgetry storytelling was a both the main entertainment and schooling for our ancestors.

King Solomon purportedly loved to listen and tell stories to teach the values of wisdom and morality. If you enjoy campfire stories, you may enjoy telling this story when your turn comes around at your next campfire.

In a novel excerpt I surmised King Solomon asking Bilqis, the Queen of Sheba the meaning of a story spoken in her language by her storyteller. The novel is a contemporary application of a story form to promote understanding of proverbs and ancient wise sayings in relation to our modern times.

Excerpt

“Tell me about the story told at the campfire.”

“That story is a very old tale about a fool that had tried to rob a wise old man. While the old man was eating alone one night, a robber entered his house.  The old man offered no resistance and even welcomed the robber to take whatever he wanted, explaining that he was an old man and did not need possessions anymore. Then the old man asked the robber to join him to supper at the dinner table. The robber being a much younger and stronger man was hungry and decided to accept the invitation.”

“During the meal, the old man explained about all his valuable possessions and asked the robber which ones he was most interested in taking. The greedy robber replied he would take all he could carry. During the meal, the robber looked down while eating with one hand on his bread and the other on his fork. As he did so, the old man suddenly pulled out a dagger and killed him.”

The point of his story is to emphasize an ancient Egyptian wise saying of Onchsheshonqt about how to make a dangerous adversary harmless so you may overcome him.”

“What may I ask is the saying?” I asked.

“A snake, which is eating, has no venom.” Bilqis replied, then rose, and stated in a comforting tone.

Source:

As A Lily Among Thorns – A Story of King Solomon, the Queen of Sheba, and the Goddess of Wisdom by Rudy U Martinka.

Available as an eBook at most sellers.  Read an excerpt by clicking below.

http://amazon.com/gp/search?field-author=rudy+martinka&index=books