a fools triumphant walk of tortuous worry.

We often  read or  hear news about various human failings exposed about people we may have held in high esteem. We may have admired them for the reputations they achieved because of what they said or did for the good or betterment of their communities, or as representatives of political, charitable, or religious organizations.

Their greatest fear  of the truth being unmasked  would subject them to consequences for their deceit. The path of a hypocrite’s triumphant walk often leads to worrisome sleep. and torturous dreams

I surmised in a novel excerpt how King Solomon, based on his proverb, may have explained to the Queen of Sheba his thoughts about hypocrites. The novel is a contemporary application of a story form to promote understanding of proverbs and ancient wise sayings in relation to our modern times.

Excerpt

“Has my advice helped answer your question Bilqis?”

“I do not know. I must dwell more on your statement that evil uses his power of persuasion to tempt fools into choosing to do evil acts. I agree that evil men use words to persuade fools to do their will. The actions men take are more convincing to determine their true character. However, there are also men that act virtuous to hide what is truly evil within them. Please take me back to my room, Solomon. I will meet you tomorrow at dinner. I have much to think about.” She replied in a curious and somewhat agitated tone.

After I escorted Bilqis back to the palace, I pondered her statement about conduct. She was wise to recognize that you cannot measure a man by their words and deeds alone. Integrity and character are the more meaningful measures of a truly wise man.

A clever hypocrite may hide or mask the secret hidden wickedness within him with good words and appearances of good deeds. They walk on a tortuous path of worry that they will be exposed and found out. However, in time, their triumphing walk will never be safe to exposure, if not by man on earth, by judgment of Yahweh in the heavens. A blameless man with character will walk in safety. He whose conduct is blameless walks in safety, but he who walks in tortuous ways is found out. (Proverb 10:9)

As I thought more deeply about her agitated parting statement, a question occurred to me. Did Bilqis just reveal that she was pondering to discern if I might be a hypocrite?

Source: 

As A Lily Among Thorns – A Story of King Solomon, the Queen of Sheba, and the Goddess of Wisdom by Rudy U Martinka.

Available as an eBook at all sellers.  Read an excerpt @

http://amazon.com/gp/search?field-author=rudy+martinka&index=books